Take action for your business TODAY!

If you are thinking of turning professional start taking action today. Set a deadline, stick to it and start taking action to make things happen.

If you wait until everything is 100% perfect then it will never happen!

This doesn’t mean you should just learn a few tricks and immediately set up a website and call yourself a professional. Before you start offering your services for money you should make sure your skills are up to it.

Start gathering photos for your website, work out how your website will look and what content will be on there. Think of what style you’ll have when you perform, and your overall branding style.

Use these ideas immediately by setting up a Facebook Business page. This is a great way to play with your marketing style before committing to paying for a professionally designed website.

Work out what your professional repertoire will involve – tricks that work well over a drink with friends probably won’t work so well at a corporate black-tie drinks reception.

Rehearse these tricks, and not just the moves but the whole patter and routine, just as you would if you were approaching a real table at an event. Try doing “dress rehearsals” at social events you are invited to as a guests.

Once everything starts coming together then start promoting yourself for a couple of paid gigs to get experience, and find out if it is something you really want to do and feel comfortable doing. Calling a room of forty screaming children to order or approaching a table at a wedding can be daunting – and completely different to doing some tricks for friends.

Set a deadline for this and work towards it. Map out an agenda, look in your diary and see what social events are coming up where you could try out some new material and work up an act.

Don’t just rush out and get business cards printed today – you will regret it – but there is no reason why you can’t set a timescale of 3 to 5 months to turn your hobby into a source of income.

Learning more

The How To Be A Professional Magician Courses cover everything you need to know to set up a business as a professional magician. The Full Course contains all the information (as well as 30 minute Skype consultation to help you get your business launched), and the abridged courses also cover business set-up.

Talking Funny – a must watch for ALL performers

I’d heard about it for years but never got round to watching it, but I wish I had sooner! If you haven’t please check out “Talking Funny”.

It features four top comedians, Ricky GervaisJerry SeinfeldChris Rock and Louis CK discussing stand-up comedy. They discuss how they got started, what drives them, how they craft a joke, their individual styles and how they develop their shows. Although they are comedians, everything they say is applicable to magicians, or any other performer.

At one point they talk about how their jokes (or ‘bits’) are like a band playing songs at a gig, and how they build up to an encore.

It’s very apparent that these guys are at the top of their game (and have consistently been there) because they had drive and passion, but also because they followed their own styles. They didn’t model themselves on others, they performed the style they want.

As well as the theory, there’s also some great practical advice to working a comedy club, hosting a show, how long a show should last and introducing other acts.

Watch the show, and keep in mind how you could take what they are talking about and how you could apply it to your performance.

Learning more

The How To Be A Professional Magician Courses cover everything you need to know to set up a business as a professional magician. The Full Course contains all the information (as well as 30 minute Skype consultation to help you get your business launched), and the abridged courses also cover business set-up.

Making Your Magic Commercial

When I made the decision to turn professional I decided that I needed repertoire of commercial tricks that I could perform for my close-up act; but I realised that I couldn’t just do a pile of card tricks, or do tricks that I liked doing.

I shortlisted tricks, practiced those, and worked on the patter; knowing that as they got performed to real live paying customers they would evolve. As the tricks developed I could add new ones and remove those that weren’t so strong.

Then I looked at what I already performed, what I liked performing, my character and the way my magic had already naturally evolved since I started learning.

I mainly thought of myself as a mentalist, and started to pursue that direction and learnt mentalism tricks and routines (probably due to Derren Brown sparking my latent interest in the art). However, I had come to realise that it lacked commercial appeal for the type of events I was promoting myself for.

But then I didn’t want to go too far the other way. I didn’t want to be a “comedy magician”, or have a whacky/zany character.

Let’s look at an example. I’ve have sponge balls, I learnt a sponge ball routine and performed it, people actually LIKED my sponge ball routine’ but it just didn’t feel comfortable for me.

Creating Your Commercial Repertoire

So how do you do this, well, pick about six tricks that YOU feel comfortable doing and that others will like and practice them. Also come up with patter and script the trick. Each time you practice you perform like you are performing for an audience so you practice the lines, not just the moves. I personally chose tricks covering many styles of magic, so my style and short-listed tricks could be refined using the Darwinian principle of Survival of the Fittest.

I came up with a set of rules and criteria to help me shortlist my tricks:

  1. Have variety – not just card tricks
  2. Can be stored in a jacket pocket for close-up
  3. No re-set (or at least very quick)
  4. Something that doesn’t need lots of explaining
  5. Visual enough to be seen by everyone round a large table
  6. Multi-stage (ideally)
  7. Involve spectators

As time went on I found my style and dropped the material that didn’t fit the direction I was wanting to go in (such as sponge balls and rope tricks) but it gave me a solid foundation to build on with a repertoire that meant from the moment I turned professional I had good tricks that worked and got positive reactions.

I still perform many of the effects that went into this original set, and have added more that fits this criteria. Not all the trick in my repertoire fit the criteria, and are perhaps more artistic and aimed to illicit a more emotional connection.

Having a routine that is new, fresh, touches emotions, takes risks but may occasionally fall flat is not a good opener for a corporate audience. A solid routine that will even entertain those that have been at the free bar. These latter routines are normally the ‘workers’, tried and tested a million times by every working magician.

My aim is to have tricks and effects that fall into both criteria. This way I have some solid material to open with and engage everyone, but can have material that is more ‘artistic’ once a connection has been established.

Note, this article is based on the “Art Vs Entertainment” lesson in the Magic Theory and Presentation section of the course, as well as in some of the abridged courses.

Learning more

The How To Be A Professional Magician Courses cover everything you need to know to set up a business as a professional magician. The Full Course contains all the information (as well as 30 minute Skype consultation to help you get your business launched), and the abridged courses also cover business set-up.

Facebook Group

There is now a Facebook group for magicians to discuss the content of this site and offer assistance to each other.

The group can be accessed at www.facebook.com/groups/howtobeaprofessionalmagician/

You will need to apply to join this group because I want to keep away spammers, however, anyone will a passing interest and a desire to learn more is welcome – it’s not just for existing professionals.

Learning more

The How To Be A Professional Magician Courses cover everything you need to know to set up a business as a professional magician. The Full Course contains all the information (as well as 30 minute Skype consultation to help you get your business launched), and the abridged courses also cover business set-up.